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Tanya Roberts, Bond Girl And Charlie’s Angels Star, Dead At 65

Viewers of a certain age may also remember her from ‘That '70s Show’.  

Tanya Roberts, the actress best known for playing a Bond girl in A View to a Kill and co-starring in Charlie’s Angels, has died. She was 65.

The 1980s icon collapsed at home following a walk with her dogs on Christmas Eve, TMZ reported. She was admitted to Cedar-Sinai Hospital in LA where she was put on a ventilator. She died on Sunday (Jan 3).

The official cause of death is currently unknown.

Roberts, who was born Victoria Leigh Blum, started out modelling and appearing on TV commercials before making her film acting debut in the 1975 horror flick Forced Entry.

After a slew of minor tele-movie roles, she was cast as an Angel on Charlie’s Angles, in the fifth and final season of the show in 1980.

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Touched by an Angel: Tanya Roberts — seen here with Jaclyn Smith and Cheryl Ladd — was  chosen from over 2,000 other candidates to replace Shelley Hack in the fifth and final season of 'Charlie's Angels'. 

Post-Angels, Roberts co-starred in the 1982 fantasy epic The Beastmaster and played the title character in 1984’s Sheena, Queen of the Jungle. The latter earned her a Worst Actress Razzie nomination.

She received another Worst Actress Razzie nomination for playing Bond Girl Stacey Sutton in A View to a Kill, Roger Moore’s seventh and final Bond adventure.

TV work dominated Roberts’ filmography in the ’90s, with her most notable role on That '70s Show as Donna Pinciotti’s (Laura Prepon) dim-witted mother Midge. She was in 81 episodes from 1998-2004, but eventually left the series to care for her sick husband, who died in 2006.

Roberts is survived by her boyfriend Lance O'Brien, and her sister Barbara.

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Gun play: Tanya Roberts in a publicity still for 1985's 'A View to a Kill', Roger Moore's seventh and final Bond flick. 

Photos: TPG News, Click Photos

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