Who Wants To Zipline Across The Ocean On A Cruise?

You don't have to stick to the same ol' rock-climbing walls and mini golf when you're on board the Genting Dream.

The German-built 18-deck Genting Dream sails to countries like China, Vietnam and Thailand, and is home-ported in Singapore till the end of this year.

We’re on board the posh cruise liner Genting Dream, checking out our stateroom with an ocean view. Everything is spanking new (after all, this flagship luxury liner was launched only last November with 142 suites and 1,674 staterooms). 

We’ve flown from Singapore to Hongkong for a 3D2N fly-cruise on the high seas, where we embark the Genting Dream via Hongkong’s latest S$1.2billion Kai Tak Cruise Terminal. And this cruise is looking really, really good. These are a few ways we entertained ourselves over the next few days.


1. Zip it
If you’ve always dreamt of gliding across the ocean like a bird, well, now you can do it ’fo real.

Genting Dream offers a 35m zipline on its top deck. Caveat: Before you can enjoy the whoosh of the flying fox, you’ve to get through a daunting rope course. A strapping lad straps us into the safety harness and herds us up a ladder. (Fun fact: it’s not hard to find a good-looking crew member on this cruise as they’re selected pretty much like flight attendants. There’s an informal height requirement of 1.73m for all staff, and one should look well-groomed.)

Rope obstacle course 

If you have a fear of heights, now is not the time to focus on how high you are from the ground or how crazily wobbly the rope trail is. And no, you can’t regret your decision: the course is designed in such a way that makes it very difficult to turn back. We grit our teeth and press on until we reach the tiny zipline launchpad suspended over the ocean, where another hunk is casually hanging out.

We glance down at the sea 18 decks below and cling onto the harness for dear life and sweet swooooshhh! We practically float on an adrenaline high across the glittering blue. What fear of heights?


2. Go to the next slide
There are six water tube slides here of varying lengths and thrill levels. We pick a blue tube which has a giant ‘bowl’ in the middle breaking the slide’s trajectory like a pit stop. You merrily zoom down the twisting tube briefly before sliding into the bowl like a ball in a roulette. Or a Cheerio in a bowl of cereal and milk.


But surprise! That’s not all. Part 2 of the slide starts as a hole at the bottom of the bowl, where you swirl into another gushing tube, like leftovers getting drained down the kitchen sink. So addictive.


3. Let’s go to the Zouk
Yes, there’s a Zouk Beach Club on board (Genting acquired the iconic Singapore night club Zouk in 2015). It's the first Zouk out at sea, where you can sip on a strong cocktail, lounge by a decadent pool and pretend to shimmy like you're Beyoncé.

If dancing in a club isn't your thing, skip Zouk and head for one of the ballroom-dancing classes on board. And you don't have to be a line-dancing auntie to like it. Our class is fast, fun and a surprisingly intense workout sesh taught by blonde, glamourous Russian professional dancers.

Oceanview stateroom

4. I like to room it, room it
Our oceanview stateroom ($799 per pax including airfare from Singapore to Hongkong for the 3D2N cruise on the high seas) comes with a small balcony with deck chairs (look Ma, no cabin fever!). This is where you can sunbathe, enjoy a cuppa and watch the sunset if you prefer not to, er, flaunt your beach body at the communal pools. We’re pleased to report that the bathroom is pretty spacious, so you don’t have to contort yourself like a Cirque de Soleil acrobat every time you go to the loo.

Dream Palace Jacuzzi 
Dream Palace Sun Deck

But if you really want to nua in style, the Dream Palace suite ($1,129 per pax including airfare from Singapore to Hongkong for a 3D2N cruise) has a private jacuzzi and a sun deck with a sofa for late-night star-gazing.


5. Pass the massage
Spa treatments on a cruise are usually overpriced, so we are pleasantly surprised to find out that a one-hour full body massage costs a wallet-friendly HK$188 (S$35) on board at the Crystal Life Asian Spa (all transactions on the ship are in HKD) — cheaper even than a typical massage in Singapore.

Our chatty Chinese masseuse, a deceptively slim young girl with deft hands and the strength of a WWE wrestler, tells us that she was trained in Suzhou, where Genting Hong Kong runs a school to prep staff for their various roles. You can also get foot massages in plush, oversized chairs while watching a movie. How’s that for enjoying life?

This trip was made possible by Genting Hong Kong. To book a cruise on Genting Dream, go to www.dreamcruiseline.com.

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